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[–]Mastermustard04 2 insightful - 1 fun2 insightful - 0 fun3 insightful - 1 fun -  (6 children)

What would you say the situation is in Bolivia, Chile and Argentina specifically, in regards to anti-white politics? I had been considering these nations as potential escape locations in the event of the US government beginning to crack down on pro-White political dissidents.

[–][deleted]  (4 children)

[deleted]

    [–]Nasser 1 insightful - 1 fun1 insightful - 0 fun2 insightful - 1 fun -  (3 children)

    Aren't Argentina, Chile, and Paraguay overwhelmingly White (80-90%+)?

    [–]ifuckredditsnitches_Resident Pajeet 1 insightful - 1 fun1 insightful - 0 fun2 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

    census wise? yes. but in reality? a bit more complicated

    [–]VacaLeitera767[S] 1 insightful - 1 fun1 insightful - 0 fun2 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

    Latin American census data is very misleading because it's based on self-identification. These numbers reflect perceived skin color a lot more than they reflect race. Chile is majority light-skinned mestizo and Argentina is mostly castizo. Same for Paraguay, where barely any Whites live at all except for White Brazilian settlers and German Mennonites.

    [–]VacaLeitera767[S] 2 insightful - 1 fun2 insightful - 0 fun3 insightful - 1 fun -  (0 children)

    Bolivia is an Indio-majority country and its government is full commie with Indio identitarian tendencies. Probably the country with the highest amount of inter-ethnic tensions in South America. On the other hand, there is a sizable community of Low German Mennonites in Bolivia, who live fully segregated from mainstream society. This is the most traditional Mennonite community on the planet and they have birth rates that are higher than even the Amish (around 8 children per woman). The Bolivian government has so far mostly left them alone, but certain sectors view them as a threat to national sovereignty since they have settled in an area that is close to the Brazilian border and could soon constitute a majority in huge swathes of rural Santa Cruz department). Speaking of Santa Cruz, it is the only Bolivian department with a mestizo (and not Indio) majority and is the stronghold of the right-wing opposition. Long-term, the potential for secession is there, on ethnopolitical but also on geographical and economic grounds.

    Chile, while having a superb quality of life in comparison to the rest of LATAM, is going through a Bolshevik coup attempt. There has been a wave of far-left protests in Chile since 2019 that has culminated with the astroturfing of a constitutional assembly and the election of leftist uber-woke president Gabriel Boric. The sham constitutional assembly has the goal of doing away with the Pinochet constitution and is as anti-white as it gets, with quotas for Indio representatives and headed by a textbook Soros feminist and LGBTQ "indigenous activist". The Chilean left is a trainwreck and the most culturally/racially extreme in LATAM. Very concerning political situation overall, although the Chilean Right is also strong and getting more and more based. The country is divided. Southern Chile (especially Araucanía region) has a high amount of Central Euro descendants and is overwhelmingly right-wing, despite local racial conflict with the indigenous Mapuche.

    Argentina is the best of the three in terms of the absence of anti-White politics, by far. Anti-White identity politics is close to non-existent in Argentina and Uruguay, despite far-left politics also being strong down there. The reason of course is that Whites are still overwhelmingly dominant in the country's upper and middle classes, and "Europeanness" has historically been a bedrock of Argentine identity which distinguishes that country from the rest of South America. Unfortunately, the demographic situation deteriorated a lot during the late 20th century due to mass immigration from neighboring countries and due to sky-high mestizo birth rates. Argentina's Europeanness still dominates the national discourse and identity, but in demographic terms, there is no White majority to be spoken of any longer. The majority are what we would call "whitewashed" castizos.